Le Scandal Valentine’s Day Extravaganza

Posted in Burlesk, Contemporary Variety, Indie Theatre, PLUGS, Valentine's Day with tags , , , on February 14, 2016 by travsd

LeScandalValentineDay2016

Burlesque-a-Pades in Loveland

Posted in Burlesk, Contemporary Variety, PLUGS, Valentine's Day with tags , , , on February 14, 2016 by travsd

12540616_1004305092926328_1579645776994156453_n

Filthy Gorgeous Burlesque Valentine’s Spectacular

Posted in Contemporary Variety, PLUGS, Valentine's Day, Vaudeville etc. with tags , , , on February 14, 2016 by travsd

Screen_Shot_2016-01-04_at_12.49.18_PM

Stars of Vaudeville #951: William Faversham

Posted in Broadway, Hollywood (History), Melodrama and Master Thespians, Movies, Silent Film, The Hall of Hams, Westerns with tags , , , , , on February 12, 2016 by travsd

220px-William_Faversham

Today is the birthday of one of the last of great actor/managers William Faversham (1868-1940). I was tempted to include him in our Hall of Hams, but though Faversham was a great dramatic actor of both stage and screen, he also  (like many such as him) toured big time vaudeville.

His film career began on the London stage, his first Broadway appearance was in 1887 in The Highest Bidder. From the New York premiere of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) he was on Broadway almost constantly until his retirement from the stage in 1931. He produced, directed and starred in Edwin Milton Royle’s The Squaw Man in 1906, later turned into more than one movie version by Cecil B. DeMille. Other plays on which he starred and either produced or directed or both included The Barber of New Orleans (1909), Julius Caesar (1912), Getting Married (1916-1917), Misalliance (1917), The Prince and the Pauper (1920-1921), The Silver Fox (1921), and A Lesson in Love (1923). He also starred in a dozen movies from 1915 through 1937. His best known today might bee his last three: the Technicolor Becky Sharpe (1935) and two low budget westerns, The Singing Buckaroo (1937) and Arizona Days (1937).

In 1914 he made his first appearances in vaudeville in a one-act version of The Squaw Man. He appeared at the Colonial Theatre and the brand new Palace at $3,000 a week. He continued appearing in vaudeville throughout the years during downtime form legit productions. He appeared at the Palace as late as 1923.

For more on vaudeville historyconsult No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous, available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and wherever nutty books are sold.

safe_image

Coney Island USA Spring Gala is in 5 Weeks!

Posted in Amusement Parks, Brooklyn, Coney Island, Dime Museum and Side Show, PLUGS, SOCIAL EVENTS with tags , , on February 12, 2016 by travsd

unnamed

The Hollywood Honeymoon Tonight

Posted in Burlesk, Indie Theatre, PLUGS with tags , , on February 12, 2016 by travsd

12631431_10100883945263641_833708911679302974_n

Stars of Vaudeville #950: Roy D’Arcy

Posted in Hollywood (History), Melodrama and Master Thespians, Movies, Silent Film, Vaudeville etc. with tags , , , , , , on February 10, 2016 by travsd

MV5BMTkxMzc3NDg2MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMTU0MjI1MzE@._V1._CR106,138,533,710_UY317_CR12,0,214,317_AL_

Today is the birthday of Roy D’Arcy (Roy Francis Giusti, 1894-1969). I am wracking my brains this morning as to how he ever got onto my radar — and I think it is because I saw him in Revolt of the Zombies (1936) a few months ago. D’Arcy specialized in screen villains. But we get ahead of ourselves.

Originally from San Francisco, D’Arcy is said to have “traveled with a band of Gypsies” and studied painting in Paris before returning to the U.S. to go on the stage. He sang in the choruses of musical comedies, and toured in vaudeville as a monologist throughout the early twenties. His break was when Erich Von Stroheim cast him as the villain in The Merry Widow (1925). Throughout the remainder of the silent era, he enjoyed stardom playing evil characters in such films as La Boheme (1926) and The Temptress (1926). When talkies arrived he was mostly relegated to B movies, serials and westerns for such studios as Monogram and Mascot, although one of his last roles was an uncredited part in Fred and Ginger’s The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle (1939). In the 40s he retired from show business and went into real estate.

For more on vaudeville historyconsult No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous, available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and wherever nutty books are sold.

safe_image

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,290 other followers

%d bloggers like this: