Archive for the Harry Langdon Category

Slapstick Comedies of World War One

Posted in Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, Comedians, Comedy, Harry Langdon, Hollywood (History), Larry Semon, Laurel and Hardy, Movies, Silent Film with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 11, 2015 by travsd

Now called Veteran’s Day, November 11 was originally set aside as a day of remembrance for the cessation of hostilities in The Great War, also known as Armistice Day. In honor of the day, we look at several WWI films from the era of classic comedy:

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The Bond (1918)

September 29, 1918 was the release date for Charlie Chaplin’s World War One propaganda film The Bond. The shabby way this country treated Chaplin in the late 1940s and early 1950s can be seen as especially unjust in light of the fact that Chaplin raised millions of dollars to fund the First World War, by making a publicity tour, along with releasing this interesting little gem. It’s easily Chaplin’s most experimental film, employing straight-up didactic allegory in pantomime to teach us that there are  “many kinds of bonds”….bond of friendship, bond of love, the marriage bond…Most important is the LIBERTY Bond—Charlie hits the Kaiser (Syd Chaplin) on the head with a sledgehammer marked “Liberty Bonds”. The simple painted studio sets are unlike anything else in the Chaplin canon. The film seems to point the way both towards the self-consciousness of Sunnyside (1919), and his exhortations at the end of The Great Dictator (1940) and Monsieur Verdoux (1947) — calls to action. Also in the film are Edna Purviance and Albert Austin, with the entire cast uncredited.

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Shoulder Arms (1918)

Chaplin’s Shoulder Arms (initially called Camouflage), was first planned to come in at five reels, about fifty minutes, which was no shorter than many features in those days.  As originally conceived, the film would have had an opening act showing the Little Fellow’s home life with his wife and kids. Then it would take him into the process of being inducted into the army. It would then have had a closing act wherein the Little Fellow is celebrated as a war hero, before inevitably being awakened from a dream. Chaplin eventually decided to cut it to just the middle – the Little Fellow’s service in the war.

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As comic subject matter this film was unprecedentedly dark, not just for Chaplin, but for the movies. No one had ever done a comedy that included trench warfare, gas masks, bullets, barbed wire, and No Man’s Land. Not only was Shoulder Arms the first war comedy, it was also the first black comedy, introducing a side of Chaplin that would come to full flowering in The Great Dictator and Monsieur Verdoux. It’s hard to imagine much of Stanley Kubrick’s work, for example, in particular Paths of Glory (1957) and Dr. Strangelove (1964) without the precedent of Shoulder Arms. Fortunately, Chaplin had already inoculated himself against charges of being unpatriotic or unserious about the war by participating in a nationwide bond drive and making the propaganda film The Bond. And the fact that Shoulder Arms was funny covered all manner of sins. Memorable takeaways included scenes where Charlie made his way through enemy territory disguised as a tree, tried to sleep in an underground barracks neck deep in water, and used his gas mask as protection against limburger cheese.

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Huns and Hyphens (1918)

Larry Semon’s war comedy is set on the home front, with Larry as a waiter at a restaurant run by German spies. He is also masquerading as a wealthy suitor to a young lady who has invented a gas mask. The plot is not unlike many Chaplin “masquerade” comedies, with Semon’s patented extravagant gags and hair-raising chase finish. Also in the cast are a pre-Hardy Stan Laurel and his wife Mae, and Frank “Fatty” Alexander. 

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A Yankee Doodle in Berlin (1919)

This WWI-era patriotic comedy is doubly interesting to us: 1) because it stars so many greats from the Sennett stock company: Ford Sterling (as the Kaiser!), Ben Turpin, Mal St. Clair, Marie Prevost, Charlie Murray, both Chester and Heinie Conklin, and the Bathing Beauties; and 2) the star of the picture is Bothwell Browne, a vaudeville drag performer whose only starring film this is. (For more on Browne go here). This was Sennett’s most ambitious film up to that time, and only his third feature. Unfortunately he gambled on the war lasting longer than it did; it was already over by the time the film was in theatres. The plot is just what you think it would be. Browne is an army captain who goes undercover in the Kaiser’s Germany, disguised as a woman. As long as Sterling or Turpin makes a pass at him, that’s all I ask!

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The Better ‘ole (1926)

This World War One comedy has a long pedigree. First it was a cartoon drawn by English humorist Bruce Bairnsfather. In 1917 it opened as a West End musical comedy running for 811 performances starring Arthur Bouchier as the main character “Old Bill”. The following year a Broadway version opened, starring Charles Coburn. 

With his years of music hall experience, Syd Chaplin was perfect for the comical part of Old Bill, a 30 year regular army vet who knows how to look out for his creature comforts. With his walrus mustache, and omnipresent pipe, the character has the kind of broad visual outline that any self-respecting Chaplin would know just what to do with. Jack Ackroyd plays his sidekick, “Little Alf”.  Edgar Kennedy plays the tough sergeant who constantly bedevils him.

There are some sight gags and funny pantomime business, but the film leans heavily on comical cockney intertitles. Bill is always napping, goofing off, getting into trouble. In one routine worthy of the younger Chaplin brother, Bill is playing with his dog, and accidentally drills an entire company of soldiers who overhear his instructions to the pooch and follow them. He spends a lot of time on trash detail.  The story starts to take off when he is putting on a camp show dressed in a horse costume, then gets stuck behind German lines still wearing the disguise. He steals some German uniforms and winds up having to serve a German general breakfast though he doesn’t understand the language. He knocks out a guard and meets fellow Brit who warns him of an immanent attack. He must warn the English army. He races in stolen car, then crashes it. Then he gets a motorcycle and plunges into a river. He is rescued and brought to a place where a detonation plunger is located. He knocks his captors out and saves and entire town. Then he is caught by Brits who think he is a spy out to sabotage his own army. He is bout to be executed but is saved at the last minute and made sergeant. He uses the opportunity to finally deck his nemesis Edgar Kennedy.

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Soldier Man (1926)

Soldier Man was Harry Langdon‘s last short before leaving Mack Sennett to do features. It’s one of his most creative and elaborate ones, containing enough for two separate shorts (since it has two completely different parts, each with a separate premise.)

In the first half he’s a soldier who doesn’t realize World War One has ended, so he is still roaming around having misadventures in German territory.  He escaped from a prison camp just when the German troops were celebrating the end of the war but he didn’t understand. Now he is wandering around a country at peace in constant fear for his life. Coming upon an area where a farmer is using dynamite to blow up tree stumps, he thinks he’s being shelled. He, winds up accidentally dragging some dynamite with him. Sees it, throws it, tries to shoo a cow out of the way. When the cow does run by Harry has his eyes closed. Dynamite lands in smokehouse, sending pieces of meat flying over to Harry. He thinks it was the cow.

In the second half.  In the little country of Bomania…there is a king who looks exactly like Harry (How many movies have we seen with that premise?). The king is is drunken and dissolute, always insults his wife. The people are on the verge of revolution. A minister spies Harry and hires him to be a double for the king. It winds up with the King’s wife trying to kiss Harry so she can plunge a knife into his back. Harry wakes up in his bed with his wife shaking him. It’s the present day, it was all a dream.

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A Soldier’s Plaything (1930)

Harry Langdon co-stars with Ben Lyon in this World War One service comedy (with serious overtones — and a few songs, although most were cut prior to American release when musicals went out of favor. It’s a fairly routine service comedy, but it has its share of laughs – including several pre-code mounds of horse manure. Furthermore, Harry is playing a character not too removed from his silent one. The difference? He’s in the hands of a real director. Michael Curtiz keeps the reins tight on Harry here. He’s plausible comic relief in this major motion picture. It’s a rare chance to see Langdon starring in a major motion picture during the talking era.

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Doughboys (1930)

Doughboys, directed by Eddie Sedgwick, is Buster Keaton ’s Shoulder Arms. It’s probably his best talkie feature, certainly his best one for MGM. Buster plays a millionaire who accidentally enlists in the army during World War I. The movie was co-written by legendary comedy scribe Al Boasberg and co-stars Cliff “Ukulele Ike” Edwards (whose most famous role is Jiminy Cricket in Pinnochio). Because Keaton’s character is more like a human being in this one, and the story hangs together better, it is closer in spirit to his silents even if there are still very few gags. Keaton has a funny musical duet with Cliff Edwards and a funny dance number in the army talent show. There are also a couple of Keatonesque gags. One of them–very grim—has Keaton propped up in a trench looking like a corpse and suddenly popping up awake. The whole movie is almost ruined by an extremely annoying drill sergeant who keeps yelling. What movie executive thought this kind of thing was funny, I’ll never know, but there sure is a lot of it in the ‘30s and ‘40s. Still, it’s a movie worth seeing.

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Half Shot at Sunrise (1930)

In this one, Wheeler and Woolsey are a couple of dough boys AWOL in Paris during World War One. They spend all their time sweet talking the ladies. Wheeler (as always) falls for Dorothy Lee, whose father just happens to be the colonel who’s been pursuing them. And Woolsey romances the colonel’s mistress (Leni Stengel), who has a bad habit of sending love letters to the colonel, a device which later allows the boys to blackmail themselves out of their difficulties. There are some battle scenes in the trenches, and a funny scene in which the boys are waiters, waiting on the colonel and his wife in a restaurant.  The colonel’s wife is of course played by the inevitable Edna May Oliver. Interestingly, one of the screenwriters (among five) was Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle.

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Pack Up Your Troubles (1932)

Laurel and Hardy‘s second feature for Hal Roach, is as close as the team came to organically being Chaplinesque, with the film mixing elements of Shoulder Arms and The Kid. In the first act of the film, they are drafted as soldiers — their drill sergeant is of course Jimmy Finlayson, with predictable results. They next go over to France to fight in The Great War, befriending a fellow soldier who happens to have a baby (a rather grown-up problem.) When Eddie is killed in action, the boys feel obligated to bring the infant back to the States to find the child’s grandparents (the baby’s mother too having been killed). This being a Laurel and Hardy comedy their actual attempts to achieve their mission will be pitifully fruitless; only coincidence will win the day.

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Blockheads (1938)

Originally intended to be Laurel and Hardy‘s last Hal Roach film (and it was their last Roach film for MGM though they made a couple more with Roach for other distributors) there would have been a nice symmetry to their career at Roach if it had been so, as Blockheads is essentially a remake of their first Roach talkie Unaccustomed as We Are (grafted onto We Faw Down). Like all of their features, it’s essentially the content of a short, stretched to go just over an hour. But this one works for me — it’s densely packed with comic material with little filler to speak of.

The pair are army buddies in WWI. Unfortunately Stan never gets the memo about the Armistice and winds up standing guard in a trench for 20 years. Returned to a convalescent home, he is taken in by Ollie — much to the perturbation of Mrs. Hardy (Minna Gombell). Left to fend for themselves, they find themselves entangled with the hotsy-totsy neighbor lady (Patricia Ellis), which gets them in Dutch with her shotgun wielding husband (Billy Gilbert). But just as life is all about the journey, comedy is all about the gags, and the pleasure of this movie is in just letting them wash over you, one after the other.

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The Great Dictator (1940)

While Chaplin’s The Great Dictator is the World War TWO comedy par excellence , it does begin with an extended World War One section, a sort of prologue in which the Little Barber grapples with a ridiculous cannon named Big Bertha and flies upside down in a bi-plane with Reginald Gardiner. Chaplin’s injured character will spend several years in a sanitarium, emerging to find that his country has gone insane. More about the film here. 

To learn more about comedy film history please check out my new book: Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to Youtube, just released by Bear Manor Mediaalso available from amazon.com etc etc etc

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Harry Langdon in “Remember When”

Posted in Comedians, Comedy, Harry Langdon, Hollywood (History), Movies, Silent Film with tags , , , , on April 26, 2015 by travsd

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Today is the anniversary of the release date of the Harry Langdon comedy short Remember When (1925), directed by Harry Edwards.

It starts out at an orphanage where Harry and a girl (Natalie Kingston) are sweethearts. When his sweetheart moves away he leaves the orphanage and becomes a tramp. 15 years pass. Harry is stealing chickens from a farm — a hilarious but where he is trying to hide them in his coat from the sheriff. When nabbed, an impossible number of chickens come out of his coat, like a clown car. Then he accidentally gets a bee’s best on his bindlestiff rather than a bundle. Bees down his pants cause him to crazy gymnastics. A scout from a nearby circus witnesses this and hires Harry to be an acrobat.  Little known to Harry his old sweetheart also works at this circus, as a bearded lady. They have a reunion, although Harry is not crazy about the beard. Later lets in a couple of dozen orphans from his old orphanage into the circus for free, and gets fired. The girl takes her beard off (it’s fake) and they have a proper reunion.

And now a clip:

For more on silent and slapstick comedy please check out my new book: Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to Youtube, just released by Bear Manor Mediaalso available from amazon.com etc etc etc

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To find out about  the history of vaudevilleconsult No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous, available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and wherever nutty books are sold.

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Two Silent Comedies on TCM Tomorrow Morning

Posted in Amusement Parks, Buster Keaton, Comedians, Comedy, Coney Island, Fatty Arbuckle, Harry Langdon, Hollywood (History), Movies, Silent Film with tags , , , , , , , , on April 15, 2015 by travsd

Slapstick Alert! Slapstick Alert!

Tomorrow morning Turner Classic Movies will be showing two terrific silent comedy shorts set in amusement parks.

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7:30am (EST): Coney Island (1917)

In this classic comedy short, Fatty Arbuckle, Buster Keaton and Al St. John take turns dating the same girl (Alice Mann) at Coney Island (despite the fact that Arbuckle’s character is married). Inevitably Arbuckle winds up going in drag in a woman’s bathing suit. In addition to priceless period footage of Coney’s Luna Park in its heyday, this film offers the sight of Keaton doing an impressive blackflip, and — even more exotic — crying!

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8:00 am (EST): Number, Please? (1920)

While the climax to this Harold Lloyd short is one of the film’s best moments, the set-up is a tad convoluted. Harold and a rival (Roy Brooks) vie for the attentions of a girl (Mildred Davis) at an amusement park. When her dog gets lost, she wants to go up in a hot air balloon operated by her uncle. The balloon will only hold two. The girl announces she will go up with whichever beau gets her mother’s permission first. The rival heads for the mother’s house in a car. Harold runs to a telephone so he can call the mother for permission. This would seem easy…but it’s a public phone in a hotel. The hilarious part is the succession of obstacles which prevent him from doing this simple thing. Then he winds up with a lost purse, which he finally gives to a goat to eat so he won’t be arrested for stealing. But it turns out to have been the girl’s purse, complete with the balloon tickets….

To learn more about comedy film history please check out my new book: Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to Youtube, just released by Bear Manor Mediaalso available from amazon.com etc etc etc

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To learn about the history of vaudevilleconsult No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous, available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and wherever nutty books are sold.

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Harry Langdon in “The Chaser”

Posted in Comedians, Comedy, Harry Langdon, Hollywood (History), Movies, Silent Film with tags , , on February 12, 2015 by travsd

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Today is the anniversary of the release date of the 1928 Harry Langdon feature The Chaser. 

Langdon’s second (and second to last) directorial effort, The Chaser seems like an attempt to compensate for the seriousness of Three’s a Crowd by making a flat-out comedy. His persona is a bit more like the pre-Capra Langdon. He plays a rake whose running-around has gotten so bad that a judge sentences him to housework and wearing a dress for six months. This one also gets a little dark (his wife thinks he has committed suicide in the last act, but that’s really no darker than the last act of Lloyd’s Hot Water). There’s plenty of drag humor as visiting salesmen mistake him for a woman. Unfortunately, the film did poorly at the box office, giving Langdon only one more chance to direct himself in a feature, the now-lost Heart Trouble. 

For more on silent and slapstick comedy please see my new book Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to Youtube, just released by Bear Manor Media, also available from amazon.com etc etc etc

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To find out more about show business past and presentconsult No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famousavailable at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and wherever nutty books are sold.

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Harry Langdon in “Boobs in the Wood”

Posted in Comedians, Harry Langdon, Hollywood (History), Movies, Silent Film with tags , , , , on February 1, 2015 by travsd

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Today is the anniversary of the release date of the Harry Langdon short Boobs in the Wood (1925), written by Arthur Ripley and directed by Harry Edwards. 

The setting is the Great North Woods, Harry and Vernon Dent are loggers, rivals for the little lunch girl (Marie Astaire). This is one of the first movies in which Langdon displays his familiar characteristics; after several months of development, the Little Elf has arrived.

Harry is a pipsqueak. He has a tiny axe, fells a sapling and can’t even make a dent in a proper tree. Yet the girl prefers Harry. Vent is going to murder him, but just mangles him and sends him on his way. Harry and the girl take jobs at a restaurant. Through a series of “favorable mishaps”, Harry gets a reputation for being tough. When Dent finally shows up, Harry gets the opportunity to prove himself.

To learn more about comedy film history please check out my new book: Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to Youtube, just released by Bear Manor Mediaalso available from amazon.com etc etc etc

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To learn about the history of vaudevilleconsult No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous, available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and wherever nutty books are sold.

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Tomorrow AM on TCM: Two B Movie Comedies

Posted in Comedy, Harry Langdon, Hollywood (History), Movies, PLUGS with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 14, 2015 by travsd

When we think of “B movies”, most of us are conditioned to go straight to genre pictures:  science fiction, horror, murder mysteries, noir, and westerns. (Thanks, French New Wave!). But comedies were also among the B pictures, not just shorts, but features. We don’t think of them much because, outside of a few franchises (the Bowery Boys, Blondie, and let’s be honest, Abbott and Costello) most of them are seldom revived. And also “bad, cheap” comedies tend to be a far more painful thing to endure than “bad, cheap” genre pictures. But B movie comedies (and musical comedies) were a cinema staple in the 30s and 40s. And there are many reasons to watch them. (Yes, one reason is that they might provide some entertainment. Good luck with that!) Another reason is that these films often showcase stars who once burned much brighter…or would burn brighter in the future. That’s the case with two pictures TCM is showing tomorrow, both directed by the legendary William “One Shot” Beaudine. (Click on highlighted links to learn more about the stars I mention)

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8:30 am (EST): Here Comes Kelly (1943)

Eddie Quillan plays a process server who gets involved with a bunch of gangsters, one of whom is played by pugilist/ club owner/ sometime thespian Slapsie Maxie Rosenbloom.

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9:45 am (EST) Hot Rhythm (1944)

A thing about a bunch of radio people who want to make a star out of a girl singer. As always, the titular leads in the film are of little interest (Dona Drake?). But the comic relief is bitchin’: Tim and Irene (Irene later became best known as Granny on the Beverly Hillbillies) and Harry Langdon.  Langdon plays a character way out of his supposed type, here a very highly strung uptight radio station manager not miles away from Franklin Pangborn. For more on the glories of late Langdon, see my recent article on Feet of Mud, the terrific Harry Langdon blog. 

That Langdon Thing

Posted in Comedy, Harry Langdon, Hollywood (History), Movies, Silent Film with tags , , , on January 12, 2015 by travsd

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I was tickled pink to get the opportunity recently to (almost) complete my Harry Langdon education by seeing the lion’s share of his extant talkies. (I had already seen some of the features. And there are some other extant ones that aren’t yet available on video). At any rate I hope my enthusiasm comes through in my guest post on Feet of Mud which can be found here. My respect for Langdon’s talent, already great, has now grown much greater. Thanks Tim Greer and Feet of Mud!

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